In 2001, Dr. Paul Bosland and his group at New Mexico State University discovered the bhut jolokia pepper, also known as the ghost pepper, in India

In 2001, Dr. Paul Bosland and his group at New Mexico State University discovered the bhut jolokia pepper, also known as the ghost pepper, in India

. It’s considered the pepper that is hottest in the world. Why is it called the ghost pepper? Bosland stated, “I think it’s because the chile is really so hot, you surrender the ghost when you consume it!”

Whether you’re the sort of experienced spice-adventurer that seeks out the ghost pepper or perhaps you just have a little kick to the food, we now have record next for you. You’ll notice that many countries that love spicy food have warmer climates. In accordance with research conducted at Cornell University, one basis for this really is that spicy food helps fight off food-spoilage microorganisms and bacteria that are foodborne. In warmer climates, specially before refrigeration, foodborne germs had been far more prone to flourish than in cooler climates. Another reason: Counterintuitively, consuming spicy foods cools the body down, or at the very least makes it feel cooler; spice induces perspiring, and also as the sweat evaporates, your skin layer cools. It does not hurt that chiles are an endorphin-boosting aphrodisiac, either.

To compile this range of a few of the spiciest countries around the world, we consulted our past directory of the world’s spiciest meals which can be worth the heartburn, checked out existing listings associated with spiciest cuisines throughout the world, and researched international dishes where chiles really are a ingredient that is key.